Project Spotlight

Dawn (2014, short drama)
Directed by Rose McGowan
Starring Tara Barr, Reiley McClendon and Hannah Marks

"Dawn is really about what we do to young girls unwittingly, and how we send them out into the world completely unprotected, in a way that has, at times, really tragic consequences. Being polite at the risk of your own internal voice of danger being silenced is a pretty dangerous thing."

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Article written on August 31, 2015 by Mycahe-mail

Wes Craven, the director who gave the world A Nightmare on Elm Street, The Scream franchise, and The Hills Have Eyes, has passed away at the age of 76 after enduring a private battle with brain cancer. Wes Craven has become synonymous with genre bending and innovative horror, challenging audiences with his bold vision. Rose of coursed starred as Tatum Riley in 1996’s Scream. As huge fan’s of Craven’s and the Scream film, we are deeply saddened by this loss and our deepest condolences go out to Mr. Craven’s loved ones.

For many of us, Scream is what introduced us to Rose McGowan, and although Tatum only appears in one film, her iconic character is still a fan favorite and one of the more memorable roles in all of the series. Rose sent out the following tweets after Craven’s family posted the announcement on his Twitter.

“Shedding tears now. A giant has left us. #wescraven #always #liveon

Thank you for being the kindest man, the gentlest man, and one of the smartest men I’ve known. Please say there’s a plot twist. #wescraven

On a personal note, as a huge horror fan, I am crushed by the news. So much of my youth was actually shaped by characters introduced by Craven. In 1997 I was introduced to horror films with a double feature screening of I Know What You Did Last Summer and Scream 2. That day my intense love of horror began. I still remember watching Scream for the first time, I remember being scared of Freddy Kruger and my uncle singing me “1, 2, Freddy’s coming for you…”. I remember looking for all the various Scream VHS box covers in every store we were in. If you are a lover of horror you know what an impact this man had on the genre and ultimately reinventing it with its cliches being brought to the surface with Scream. He gave us one of the most frightening (and cool) baddies with Freddy. Then he flipped the script and gave us a reinvention with A New Nightmare. Let us not forget his first film The Last House on the Left is one of the most brutal and scary films well before intensely brutal horror films became the thing. He gave us Freddy Kruger, Ghostface, Tatum Riley, Sidney Prescott, Nancy Thompson and let’s not forget he introduced us to a then unknown Johnny Depp!

His imagination and films will live on with us forever. Rest in pieces, Mr. Craven. 🔪

“What I’ve tried to do is make movies where I can honestly say I haven’t seen that before.” – Wes Craven

Wes Craven RIP

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Articles Gallery Media Alerts
Article written on August 30, 2015 by Mycahe-mail

Rose McGowan knows three versions of herself through and through: the woman she is, the woman you thought of her as, and the woman she’s becoming. The former is a staunch feminist, articulate and no-holds barred. The latter is a filmmaker with what many are finding to be surprising depth and vision. It’s that middle one—that pesky version that for years shaded McGowan in every color but gray. That’s the one she ran away from seven years ago, that’s the one that she’s making sure never comes back.

We speak the day after the Golden Globes, which she was slated to attend until her body went into what she calls a “psychosomatic seizure” that debilitated her. Considering the alternative—hobnobbing with industry elite and foreign press members—it seems she may have gotten the better end of the stick.

“It just all feels like a scene in a movie that you’ve been in so many times, you forget why you keep going,” McGowan says. “It becomes about, ‘why did you cut your hair?’ Why the fuck not? How about that?”

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Article written on August 24, 2015 by Mycahe-mail

Tired of Hollywood’s misogynistic attitudes towards female actors, Rose McGowan has quit acting to make films that tell women’s stories.

As her debut short-film Dawn, is set to be released on June 21st on YouTube we met with Rose McGowan and discussed her new vocation as a film director, the story behind her upcoming first feature film The Pines, and her escape from Hollywood’s status quo of misogyny. And as it turns out, her new professional journey is far more personal than one could imagine.

First things first, let’s discuss your short-film debut, Dawn, the tragedy of a teenage girl…
Dawn is about growing up as a young woman in the 60s, experiencing first love and femininity, but it is also about asking what happens when we as a society, with maternal influences, bind our daughter’s hands? How we give them no defense mechanism at all-we only say ‘no, you can’t do this’, without explaining why. But it also questions the idea of masculinity, the two men that Dawn idolises are Robert Hunter and Rock Hudson, now known as gay actors, but at the time, they would have been her teenage dream. I also wanted to question class disparity by putting an emphasis on the material contrast between the working class and the middle class–for example, the condition of Dawn’s family car which is brand new, versus the boy’s car, who works at a gas station, which is much older. I say a lot without having to hit anybody over the head. So it’s not a coming-of-age story per se, it’s rather a cautionary tale.

What about the casting, how did you chose your actors?
I didn’t want anybody to look like an actor from L.A. I got Tara Barr to play Dawn, her face doesn’t have this innocent baby-fat anymore. As for the male lead role, I was looking for somebody who could embody a paedophile, a victimiser, a manipulator capable of gently scrambling Dawn’s brain.

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Article written on August 24, 2015 by Mycahe-mail

I’m going to tell you about the Nine Lives of Rose McGowan. They’re lives of intersection, lives of expression, lives occasionally glazed with death, the macabre, the dying. They’re lives of spotlight, scrutiny, sex, and longing. They’re lives not yet lived, and lives long forgotten.

Rose McGowan is drinking tequila with muddled jalapeños, her shoulders exposed from a white dress to a balmy Santa Ana breeze atop a boutique hotel in Hollywood, her hair cut short in a punishing bob. Our opening exchange is taut and tense, warm and nuanced, marked as much by polarity as the subsequent conversation that follows. To wit: McGowan’s digesting today’s closure of the agency that currently represents her for acting, Resolution, run by former ICM chairman, Jeff Berg, while enjoying a declaratively charmed review of her directorial debut, Dawn, by The New York Times.

Life, in this moment now, is moving like a current through McGowan, knotted up and ready to incite something, anything. It’s when she laughs—as she’ll do while chewing on ideas of art, fame, sex, expectation, power, and spiritual renewal—that this is most evident. It’s a stage laugh, capable of rattling the nosebleeds, almost superhuman.

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Article written on August 24, 2015 by Mycahe-mail

Rose McGowan does not follow the typical blueprint for Hollywood starlets. Her silent-siren beauty aside, the outspoken actress drives faster than most men we know and scarfed down eggs, bacon, and biscuits before our photo shoot. McGowan is someone who genuinely does what she wants, and doesn’t sugarcoat or falsify her intentions. As an actress, McGowan has established herself as a cult icon, with roles in fanboy favorites like Scream, Grindhouse, and the TV showCharmed. But her latest role is as filmmaker, with her directorial debut, Dawn, debuting last January at the Sundance Film Festival. A short film about girl culture in the 1960s, Dawn is McGowan’s purest attempt at expressing her artistic vision. We spoke to her recently about this new chapter in her career.

Can you describe the world that Dawn has been exposed to and how that relates to the feminist undertones in the film?
Setting Dawn in 1961 allowed me to examine the pretty straight jacket that girls were raised to exist in. The post-war ideal of femininity both fascinates and horrifies me. I realized I could say a lot about that by making a study of Dawn’s repression.

How do you feel that your experience as an actress in Hollywood has influenced your transition into directing- specifically regarding the projects you’ll take on?
Everything relates. It’s a special trick of the mind to think that we are only allowed to be or do one thing. Acting is an art, but I wasn’t feeling like an artist. To be a frustrated artist is a special kind of torture. I am now very comfortable having my own voice. I know what I will and won’t do as a director and I learned that from being an actress. Read the full article »

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